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Surgical Instructions

Instructions for All IV Sedation Patients Prior to Surgery

IV Sedation is performed to make your surgical experience relaxing and pleasant. In order to provide your anesthesia safely, please read and follow these instructions:

  • Do not have ANYTHING to eat or drink (including water) after midnight the night before your surgery. If you were told to take a medication before surgery, take a few sips of water only. Please consult with Dr. Owsley regarding any medications you are taking.
  • You MUST HAVE SOMEONE BRING YOU AND REMAIN in the office during your surgery. They will need to stay in the recovery area until all of your post-operative instructions are completed and you are released. You can not drive or resume any activity which requires good judgment and coordination following intravenous sedation. You will need to have someone stay with you for the first 24 hours following your surgery.
  • In order to monitor your heart and blood pressure, and to start the intravenous sedation, please wear a shirt that is loose fitting.
  • Please do not wear your contact lenses, nail polish, lip stick, make-up or jewelry the morning of surgery.
  • For all oral surgery procedures, please brush your teeth just before coming for your appointment in order to reduce bacteria and prevent infection
  • For all cosmetic surgery procedures, do not take aspirin (Anacin, Bufferin, Goody’s, baby aspirin), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin), naproxen (Aleve) or any other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) similar to these medications for 1 week prior to surgery; these will promote bleeding and bruising. Similarly red wine, garlic powder supplements, and vitamin E should be discontinued because they impair normal clotting and can predispose to excessive bleeding and bruising. It is permissible to take acetaminophen (Tylenol).
  • Please follow any additional instructions given to you, at the time of your consultation, not listed above.

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Instructions for Patients after Oral Surgery Procedures

Post-operative care is very important following oral surgery. Unnecessary pain and complications can be minimized if the post-operative instructions are followed carefully.

Immediately Following Surgery:

  • If you have received any form of sedation, do not operate a motor vehicle or resume any activity that requires good judgment and coordination for 24 hours following your surgery.
  • Bite with firm steady pressure on the sterile gauze pad, provided by our office, for approximately one hour following surgery. DO NOT CHEW THE PAD. Use additional pads only as needed to control bleeding after the first hour.
  • DO NOT RINSE YOUR MOUTH WITH ANYTHING FOR 24 HOURS; however, continue to brush your teeth carefully. After 24 hours, in addition to your routine brushing, GENTLY rinse your mouth with a lukewarm saltwater solution (made by dissolving ½ teaspoon of table salt in an 8 ounce glass of warm water). Rinse 3 to 4 times a day for 4 or 5 days. Take care not to strain or empty your mouth with undue force.
  • Do not smoke following your surgery. This can cause additional pain and delayed healing.
  • Take all medications as they have been prescribed by our office. If a prescription for pain is given, you should not operate a motor vehicle while taking this medication.

Pain:

  • Some discomfort may be expected following oral surgery procedures. Two or three ibuprofen (Advil, Nuprin) or 1-2 extra strength Tylenol tablets every 3 to 4 hours will usually relieve the discomfort. If greater discomfort is anticipated, a prescription can be given.
  • You should begin taking pain medication as soon as the numbing medication begins to wear off.
  • The discomfort should subside more and more every day. If pain persists, it may require attention and you should call our office at (336)288-0677.

Bleeding:

  • Some minor bleeding following oral surgery is normal. However, if excessive bleeding occurs, fold a piece of sterile gauze pad as tightly as possible and place this directly over the empty space where the tooth was removed, or on the point of bleeding and bite with firm and steady pressure against the pad for 1 hour.
  • If bleeding continues, bite on a moistened tea bag for 1 hour. The tannic acid in the tea bag helps to form a clot by contracting bleeding vessels.
  • If these measures are not helpful, call our office at (336)288-0677 for further instructions.

Swelling and Bruising:

  • Swelling is common after oral surgery for up to one week with the maximum amount of swelling present on the 2nd or 3rd day after surgery. The swelling will slowly resolve over 4 to 7 days.
  • Removal of impacted wisdom teeth and more invasive surgical procedures warrant the early application of ice packs. Apply an ice bag to the outside of the face for 20 minutes, and then leave off for 10 minutes. Repeat this procedure for 24 hours, and then discontinue using the ice. This will reduce discomfort, bruising and swelling.
  • The first evening after surgery, keep your head elevated while sleeping, 1-2 pillows are usually adequate.
  • Discoloration of the face (bruising) may occur following surgery. This will resolve over 5-7 days and should not cause concern.

Diet:

  • You may eat and drink following oral surgery. Start with clear liquids for the first several hours and advance to a soft diet if your stomach is settled. Soft foods are then advisable for at least 24 hours. Try to avoid the surgical site when eating.
  • Drink as much liquid as possible. Try to avoid anything hot while you are still numb and DO NOT DRINK THROUGH A STRAW.
  • Try to maintain a normal diet. You will feel better and recover quicker. You can typically resume a normal diet 1 to 2 days following your surgery.

Finally:

  • Sutures, if they were used, typically dissolve on their own and do not need to be removed. If your sutures require removal, this will be done at your post-operative appointment.
  • Tightness in the cheeks and limitation in opening may occur for several days. Warm saltwater rinses 3-4 times per day will be helpful in relieving this discomfort. The application of moist heat packs, after the first 24 hours, for 20-30 minutes 2-3 times daily can also help.
  • Sharp bony projections through the gum tissue may be noticed by the patient. During the healing process, these fragments of bone may loosen and work up through the gum tissue. Often they will work out by themselves. If they become too uncomfortable please call our office at (336)288-0677 for further instructions.
  • If numbness of the lip, chin or tongue occurs after surgery there is no cause for alarm. There is most likely swelling or bruising around the nerve that gives feeling or sensation to these areas. This is usually temporary in nature; however we will follow your progress in the office until the sensation returns.
  • Your case is individual. No two mouths are the same. Well intended advice from friends may be incorrect. Please call our office with any concerns or questions you might have.

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Instructions for Patients after Bone Grafting/Sinus Lift Procedures

Post-operative care is very important following bone grafting and/or sinus lift procedures. Unnecessary pain and complications can be minimized if the post-operative instructions are followed carefully. If you have had sinus lift procedure, please follow the instructions listed in the Sinus Precautions section, as well as those listed below.

Immediately Following Surgery:

  • Do not disturb or touch the wound.
  • Do not apply pressure with your tongue or fingers to the grafted area, as the material is movable during the initial healing.
  • Do not lift or pull on the lip to look at the sutures. This can actually cause damage to the wound site and tear the sutures.
  • If you have received any form of sedation, do not operate a motor vehicle or resume any activity which requires good judgment and coordination for 24 hours following your surgery.
  • Bite with firm steady pressure on the sterile gauze pad, provided by our office, for approximately one hour following surgery. DO NOT CHEW THE PAD. Use additional pads only as needed to control bleeding after the first hour.
  • DO NOT RINSE OR SPIT FOR 24 HOUR FOLLOWING SURGERY. After 24 hours, GENTLY rinse your mouth with a lukewarm saltwater solution (made by dissolving ½ teaspoon of table salt in an 8 ounce glass of warm water). Rinse 3 to 4 times a day for 4 or 5 days. Take care not to strain or empty your mouth with undue force.
  • Do not brush your teeth in the area of surgery for 48 hours. When brushing, use a soft tooth brush and be very gentle.
  • DO NOT SMOKE following your bone graft or sinus lift surgery. This can cause additional pain, delayed healing and loss of the bone graft.
  • Take all medications as they have been prescribed by our office. If a prescription for pain is written, you should not operate a motor vehicle while taking this medication.

Pain:

  • Some discomfort may be expected following oral surgery procedures. Two or three ibuprofen (Advil, Nuprin) or 1-2 extra strength Tylenol tablets every 3 to 4 hours will usually relieve the discomfort. If greater discomfort is anticipated, a prescription can be given.
  • You should begin taking pain medication as soon as the numbing medication begins to wear off.
  • The discomfort should subside more and more every day. If pain persists, it may require attention and you should call our office at (336)288-0677.

Bleeding:

Some bleeding following oral surgery is normal. If you have any questions or concerns call our office at (336)288-0677 for further instructions.

Swelling and Bruising:

  • Swelling is common after oral surgery for up to one week with the maximum amount of swelling present on the 2nd to 3rd day after surgery. The swelling will slowly resolve over 4 to 7 days.
  • If there is an increase in swelling in your mouth, cheek or under your eye after 3 days, please contact our office at (336)288-0677
  • The evening after surgery keep your head elevated while sleeping, 1-2 pillows are usually adequate.
  • Discoloration of the face (bruising) may occur following surgery. This will resolve over 5-7 days and should not cause concern.

Diet:

  • You may eat and drink following oral surgery. Start with clear liquids for the first several hours and advance to a soft diet if your stomach is settled. Soft foods are then advisable for at least the first 24 hours. Try to avoid the surgical site when eating.
  • Drink as much liquid as possible. Try to avoid anything hot while you are still numb and DO NOT DRINK THROUGH A STRAW.
  • Try to maintain a normal diet. You will feel better and recover quicker. You can typically resume a normal diet 1 to 2 days following your surgery.

Finally:

  • Sutures, if they were used, typically dissolve on their own and do not need to be removed. If your sutures require removal, this will be done at your post-operative appointment.
  • You may notice some small granules (bone graft material) in your mouth for the first several days. Do not be alarmed, this is normal.
  • If numbness of the lip, chin or tongue occurs after surgery there is no cause for alarm. There is most likely swelling or bruising around the nerve that gives feeling or sensation to these areas. This is usually temporary in nature; however we will follow your progress in the office as the sensation returns.
  • If you notice the unexpected flow of air or liquids between your mouth and nose, please let our office know immediately. In addition, please let us know if you have sinus or nasal congestion on the side your surgery was performed.
  • As with any procedure, unexpected post-operative complications can occur. Following these instructions will help, but if you have any concerns or questions regarding your progress please contact our office at (336)288-0677.

Sinus Precautions:

  • A small opening is present between your mouth and sinus. After a sinus lift procedure, the opening is surgically closed with sutures; however, additional time is needed for complete and permanent healing of the opening. This usually takes between 10-14 days.
  • To heal properly the goal is to prevent the creation of any pressure difference between your mouth and nose, which communicates with your sinuses.
  • If you have had a sinus lift procedure, expect a small amount of bloody drainage from your nose. The drainage should stop over the first 24 hours following your surgery.
  • DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES BLOW YOUR NOSE OR FORCEFULLY SNIFF FOR THE NEXT FOUR WEEKS, if you have had a sinus lift procedure. Blotting or dabbing your nose with a Kleenex is ok. Sneeze with your mouth open. Avoid anything that causes pressure in your nasal cavities, such as, blowing up balloons or “bearing down” when lifting heavy objects.
  • DO NOT USE A STRAW TO DRINK.
  • DO NOT SMOKE for the length of the healing process. This can cause pain, delayed healing and loss of the bone graft.
  • Rinse, very gently, with warm salt water 3-4 times daily.
  • Take all medications prescribed as directed. Typically you will have been prescribed an antibiotic and asked to take an over the counter decongestant, such as Mucinex D. Take the entire course of antibiotics and use the Mucinex D two times per day for 10 days.

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Instructions for Patients after Jaw Surgery

Post-operative care is extremely important following corrective jaw surgery. Unnecessary pain and complications can be minimized if the post-operative instructions are followed carefully.

Medications:

  • You may be given a prescription for an antibiotic. This medicine should be taken at the appropriate intervals as described on the bottle. Be sure not to miss any doses and to take this medicine until it is gone. Note: Some types of antibiotics can reduce the contraceptive effects of birth control pills. It is recommended that another form of birth control be used for protection as well, during your course of antibiotics. Please contact your gynecologist if you have concerns.
  • Pain medication should be taken only during the time that you feel significant discomfort. If the pain is severe, the prescription medications can be used. However, if only mild discomfort is experienced, try to use a less potent, over-the-counter medication such as ibuprofen or Tylenol. These can be obtained in tablet or liquid form.
  • Decongestants, such as Mucinex D, are recommended to help relieve the stuffiness of the nose and sinuses. Take the medicine as indicated on the bottle, twice a day, for 10 days, or as needed for congestion.
  • Nasal spray (Afrin, Neo-Synephrine or equivalent) can be used at 6-8 hour intervals to help improve breathing through your nose. In order to prevent overuse of the nasal spray, this can be alternated with plain saline (salt water or Ocean spray) nasal spray. These can be purchased from your pharmacy. IF YOU HAVE HAD UPPER JAW SURGERY, DO NOT BLOW YOUR NOSE FOR 10 DAYS.
  • Use Vaseline ointment to keep your lips moist. Keep enough Vaseline ointment on the lips to keep them looking wet.
  • The first few days after surgery you may have some difficulty sleeping. If this becomes a problem please call the office at (336)288-0677 to discuss the situation. Dr. Owsley may prescribe medicine to help you sleep better. Usually you only need to take this medicine for two or three nights to help re-establish a good sleeping pattern.

Ice and Dressings:

  • Place ice packs over the eye/cheek areas for 24 hours. These should be left on for 30 minutes and left off for 30 minutes and so forth. Do not put ice on the surgical areas after 24 hours unless you are told to do so. Ice packs will often keep swelling and bruising to a minimum, but bruising often lasts anywhere from 1-2 weeks. After 48 hours, moist heat is helpful with swelling. Your skin may be numb after surgery, which is normal. Be very careful not to burn your skin.
  • When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.
  • In many cases there will be some type of pressure dressing or bandages that will be applied to also help reduce swelling and bleeding.
  • The elastic facial bandage should not be removed for the first 24 hours. Dr. Owsley will remove the bandage at your first post-operative appointment and will give instructions at that point for continued use.
  • If you had chin surgery you may have some tape over the chin area. This can be removed 3-4 days following surgery.

Drinking:

  • Taking in adequate amounts of fluid is essential following surgery. You need between 2 to 2 ½ quarts per day.
  • Initially after surgery you will be given a syringe and small tube to help you begin taking liquid by mouth.
  • Attempt to drink from a cup as soon as possible. While some fluid may spill when drinking, a cup is still the most effective way for taking fluids. Tip your head back slightly and attempt to open your mouth a tiny bit while pouring the fluid into your mouth. Pour slowly and take in a small amount of fluid then attempt to swallow. This will be difficult at first, but you will find that it will become much easier in a day or two.
  • Do not drink raw milk products for two days after surgery. Raw milk adheres to the incision areas and may promote infections. Processed milk products, such as canned milk based drinks or cooked milk as in creamed soups, are fine.

Eating:

Initially it will be difficult to eat adequate amounts of food in only three meals per day. Try to eat five or six times a day, eating smaller portions each time. When shown how, you may remove the elastic bands during eating.

The First 5-7 Days after Surgery:

Your diet should be pureed or blenderized. While this can include soups and food with baby food consistency, this type of diet does not necessarily mean foods that are of liquid consistency. You can also eat foods such as mashed potatoes, applesauce, oatmeal and pudding. It may be difficult to open your mouth wide enough to get a spoon inside so a small baby spoon may be helpful. Some sort of diet supplement such as Boost, Ensure or Sustecal may be used once or twice a day to increase calorie intake.

Changes in your diet as well as the use of pain medicine may cause constipation. If you have not had a bowel movement within 2-3 days after surgery you should begin to add fiber to your diet. Start by taking Metamucil (1 teaspoon mixed with 8 ounces of water 3 times per day). If this does not help within a day or two, please call our office and we can suggest other medications.

For Days 7 Through 14:

Your diet should include foods that are extremely soft in consistency and require only minimal chewing. Good examples are very soft scrambled eggs and small pieces of pasta, refried beans and soft casseroles.

After the First 14 Days:

Gentle chewing may be attempted but food should continue to be soft in consistency. We suggest food such as very soft ground meat cut into small pieces, soft flaky fish or shredded chicken. Avoid eating anything which requires a lot of pressure between your teeth or that you must chew for long periods of time.

Six Weeks After Surgery:

The splint has usually been removed and you will find it is much easier to eat. However, remember it will be a few more weeks until the jaw has completed the initial phase of healing so food should still be somewhat soft and cut into small pieces. Foods such as pizza, apples and tough meats should be avoided until at least 10 weeks after surgery.

Elastics:

  • A thin plastic splint, with indentations for each tooth, is wired to the upper braces, during surgery, to guide the jaw into its new position. Usually elastics (small rubber bands) are placed over small hooks on your braces or arch wires immediately after surgery to help limit jaw function and train your muscles to bite into this new position.
  • The elastics should be worn at all times except when eating. They should be placed in the manner shown to you during your last appointment.
  • The elastics should be removed during eating but should be replaced immediately after you clean your teeth.
  • Elastics should be changed to new ones once or twice each day as they will become stretched after being worn.

Hygiene:

  • It is extremely important for you to keep all areas inside your mouth clean after surgery. You should brush your teeth and rinse your mouth after eating. Since you will most likely be eating 5-6 times per day, you will need to clean your teeth at each of these intervals.
  • During the first week after surgery, be careful while brushing your teeth to keep the bristles of the toothbrush on or very near the teeth and braces. You may have some soreness and difficulty opening your mouth which may prevent you from brushing the tongue side of your teeth. In time this will improve, you should be able to accomplish this without difficulty within the first week to ten days following surgery.
  • Each time you brush your teeth place a small amount of toothpaste on the toothbrush and brush all areas of the braces on the top and bottom. Also brush all around the splint as much as you can.
  • Rinse your mouth thoroughly with warm salt water or with diluted mouthwash mixed with a 50/50 solution of mouthwash and water.
  • Seven days following your surgery you can begin using a Waterpik if you have one.
  • You must not smoke or use other tobacco products for at least 4 weeks following surgery. This can increase the chance of infection and create problems with healing.

Physical Activity:

  • Following surgery you will find your energy level is much lower. This will take some time to return to normal. When you attempt to return to normal activity, start slowly and work up to your normal level.
  • Physical exercise, such as walking or running, can begin 2-3 weeks after surgery. Begin by going short distances and at a slower pace than usual.
  • As your endurance and confidence increases gradually increase the level of exercise.

Jaw Exercises:

The jaws can be moved slightly during the initial phase of healing but it must be remembered that during this period the bones are not healed and are simply being held together by small bone screws and plates. Therefore we encourage a gradual progression of movement.

The First 7-10 Days Following Jaw Surgery:

Movement may be difficult due to the soreness in the muscles and bones of your jaw. We do not recommend any specific exercises during the first 7-10 days after surgery. However, simply attempting to open your mouth and move your jaw side to side several times a day may help increase movement.

10 Days to 4 Weeks After Surgery:

Stand in front of a mirror and attempt to open and close your jaw as much as possible. At 10 days after surgery you should be able to get one finger in between your teeth, and this should increase to two fingers by 4 weeks. Simply move your jaw forward and backward, side to side, and open and close attempting to increase your mouth opening with your jaw muscles only. Moist heat placed on the side of your face before and during these exercises may make them more comfortable and more effective. Do not use finger pressure on your teeth to help stretch your jaw opening at this time.

4-8 Weeks Following Surgery:

You should be able to get two fingers in between your front teeth very comfortably and can begin using very gentle finger pressure between the back teeth on each side of your mouth to help gently stretch your jaw muscles. Again, doing these stretching exercises as well as moving your jaw side to side and forward and backward will help. Moist heat can also be used at this time.

By the Eighth Week:

You should be able to place three fingers between your front teeth. It is also very important to move the muscles used for facial expressions.

Finally:

Recovery from surgery requires a significant effort on your part. Remember sometimes post-surgical progress can be uncomfortable and may occur slowly.

As with any procedure, unexpected post-operative complications can occur. Following these instructions will help, but if you have any concerns or questions regarding your progress please contact our office at (336)288-0677.

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Instructions for Patients after Cosmetic Surgery

Post-operative care is extremely important following facial cosmetic surgery. Unnecessary pain and complications can be minimized if the post-operative instructions are followed carefully.

Facelift

Head Elevation: When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.

Dressings: Do not remove your bandages unless instructed to do so. These will be removed, along with any drains present, at the office on your first post-operative visit.

Ice Packs: Place ice packs over the cheek areas for 24 hours. These should be left on for 30 minutes and left off for 30 minutes and so forth. Do not put ice on the surgical areas after 48 hours unless you are told to do so. Ice packs will often keep swelling and bruising to a minimum, but bruising often lasts anywhere from 7-14 days. After 48 hours, moist heat is helpful with swelling. Your skin may be numb after surgery, which is normal. Be very careful not to burn your skin. The numbness may persist for several months.

Medications: Please take your prescribed medications as directed on the bottle. The pain medication should be taken only as needed, and then with food to avoid nausea. You should not drive or operate any vehicle while taking prescription pain medication.

Diet: Upon arriving home from surgery, please begin with clear liquids until you are fully awake. Then you may begin to increase the consistency of your diet as tolerated.

Incision Line Care: Please gently clean your incisions with a 50/50 peroxide and water solution and Q-tips. Your incision lines should be covered with Neosporin ointment. They may need cleaning 1-2 times per day. Your sutures will be removed in one week.

Returning to Work: The average person returns to work 10-12 days following surgery. This varies from patient to patient and depends primarily on the amount of bruising present. Bruising can be masked with camouflage type make-up after suture removal.

Sun Exposure: Please avoid excessive sun exposure of the face. Ordinary exposure is not harmful, but a sunscreen and a wide brimmed hat should be used.

Finally: Please report the following immediately:

  • Excessive Pain
  • Excessive Bleeding
  • A sudden swelling or discoloration
  • A temperature greater than 100 orally
  • Excessive fatigue or depression

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Forehead/Brow Lift

Head Elevation: When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.

Dressings: Do not remove your bandages unless instructed to do so. It will be removed, along with any drains present, at the office on your first post-operative visit.

Ice Packs: Place ice packs over the eye areas for 24 hours. These should be left on for 30 minutes and left off for 30 minutes and so forth. Do not put ice on the surgical areas after 48 hours unless you are told to do so. Ice packs will often keep swelling and bruising to a minimum, but bruising often lasts anywhere from 7-14 days. After 48 hours, moist heat is helpful with swelling. Your skin may be numb after surgery, which is normal. Be very careful not to burn your skin. The numbness may persist for several months.

Medications: Please take your prescribed medications as directed on the bottle. The pain medication should be taken only as needed, and then with food to avoid nausea. You should not drive or operate any vehicle while taking prescription pain medication.

Diet: Upon arriving home from surgery, please begin with clear liquids until you are fully awake. Then you may begin to increase the consistency of your diet as tolerated.

Incision Line Care: Please gently clean your incisions with a 50/50 peroxide and water solution and Q-tips. Your incision lines should be covered with Neosporin ointment. They may need cleaning 1-2 times per day. Your sutures will be removed in one week.

Returning to Work: The average person returns to work 7-10 days following surgery. This varies from patient to patient and depends primarily on the amount of bruising present. Bruising can be masked with camouflage type make-up after suture removal.

Sun Exposure: Please avoid excessive sun exposure of the face. Ordinary exposure is not harmful, but a sunscreen and a wide brimmed hat should be used.

Finally: Please report the following immediately:

  • Excessive Pain
  • Excessive Bleeding
  • A sudden swelling or discoloration
  • A temperature greater than 100 orally
  • Excessive fatigue or depression

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Eyelid Surgery

Head Elevation: When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.

Ice Packs: Place ice packs over the eye areas for 24 hours. These should be left on for 30 minutes and left off for 30 minutes and so forth. Do not put ice on the surgical areas after 24 hours unless you are told to do so. Ice packs will often keep swelling and bruising to a minimum, but bruising often lasts anywhere from 7-14 days. After 48 hours, moist heat is helpful with swelling. Your skin may be numb after surgery, which is normal. Be very careful not to burn your skin. The numbness may persist for several months.

Medications: Please take your prescribed medications as directed on the bottle. The pain medication should be taken only as needed, and then with food to avoid nausea. You should not drive or operate any vehicle while taking prescription pain medication.

Diet: Upon arriving home from surgery, please begin with clear liquids until you are fully awake. Then you may begin to increase the consistency of your diet as tolerated.

Incision Line Care: If you had upper eyelid surgery, gently clean your incisions with a 50/50 peroxide and water solution and Q-tips. Your incision lines should be covered with Neosporin ointment. They may need cleaning 1-2 times per day. Your sutures will be removed in one week.

Returning to Work: The average person returns to work 7-10 days following surgery. This varies from patient to patient and depends primarily on the amount of bruising present. Bruising can be masked with camouflage type make-up after suture removal.

Sun Exposure: Please avoid excessive sun exposure of the face. Ordinary exposure is not harmful, but a sunscreen and a wide brimmed hat should be used.

Finally: Please report the following immediately:

  • Excessive Pain
  • Excessive Bleeding
  • A sudden swelling or discoloration
  • A temperature greater than 100 orally
  • Excessive fatigue or depression

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Cosmetic Nasal Surgery

Head Elevation: When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.

Dressings: You will be given extra gauze to change the “drip dressing” under your nose. Please change the dressing periodically as it becomes saturated. Please remember to keep the plastic splint that is placed on your nose dry and intact. This dressing is very important in the healing process. Your splint will be removed at your one week post-operative visit. Dr. Owsley will remove the packs that are in your nose at your first post-operative visit, the day following surgery. DO NOT BLOW YOUR NOSE for approximately two weeks. Any drainage can be gently wiped.

Ice Packs: Place ice packs over the eye/cheek areas for 24 hours. These should be left on for 30 minutes and left off for 30 minutes and so forth. Do not put ice on the surgical areas after 24 hours unless you are told to do so. Ice packs will often keep swelling and bruising to a minimum, but bruising often lasts anywhere from 7-14 days.

Medications: Please take your prescribed medications as directed on the bottle. The pain medication should be taken only as needed, and then with food to avoid nausea. You should not drive or operate any vehicle while taking prescription pain medication.

Diet: Upon arriving home from surgery, please begin with clear liquids until you are fully awake. Then you may begin to increase the consistency of your diet as tolerated.

Returning to Work: The average person returns to work 7-10 days following surgery. This varies from patient to patient and depends primarily on the amount of bruising present. Bruising can be masked with camouflage type make-up after suture removal.

Sun Exposure: Please avoid excessive sun exposure of the face. Ordinary exposure is not harmful, but a sunscreen and a wide brimmed hat should be used.

Finally: Please report the following immediately:

  • Excessive Pain
  • Excessive Bleeding
  • A sudden swelling or discoloration
  • A temperature greater than 100 orally
  • Excessive fatigue or depression

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Chemical Peels

Head Elevation: When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.

Medications: Please take your prescribed medications as directed on the bottle. The pain medication should be taken only as needed, and then with food to avoid nausea. You should not drive or operate any vehicle while taking prescription pain medication.

Diet: Upon arriving home from surgery, please begin with clear liquids until you are fully awake. Then you may begin to increase the consistency of your diet as tolerated.

Skin Care: A special dressing is sometimes initially placed after a chemical peel. It is typically removed after 48 hours at your post-operative visit. Once the dressing is removed it is vital to keep the skin from drying out or crusting. Failure to do so can result in pain, pigmentation and scarring. Gently clean your face, to remove the crusting, with a mild facial cleanser. Non-mentholated shaving cream works well. After cleaning, keep the skin moist with Neosporin ointment or with a thin coat of Vaseline. Do not wear make-up until told by Dr. Owsley that you are allowed to do so.

Redness and Tightness: As your chemical peel begins to heal, your new skin will be red (like a sunburn) and/or feel tight (much like a mask). This will typically last for several weeks and then fade away.

Sensitivity: Your new skin will be delicate and sensitive. Do not use astringents or exfoliatives for several weeks after the procedure. Do not wear contacts and/or glasses if you have had a chemical peel around your eyes until you have completely healed. Avoid sleeping on the area you have had chemically peeled until completely healed. Also, avoid scratching the area. DO NOT PICK OR PEEL AWAY THE CRUSTING.

Returning to Work: The average person returns to work 7-10 days following surgery. This varies from patient to patient and depends primarily on the amount of flaking, peeling and redness of the skin.

Sun Exposure: Please avoid any direct sun exposure of the face for the first 2 weeks. Ordinary exposure after that is not harmful, but a sunscreen and a wide brimmed hat should always be used.

Finally: Please report the following immediately:

  • Excessive Pain
  • Excessive Bleeding
  • A sudden swelling or discoloration
  • A temperature greater than 100 orally
  • Excessive fatigue or depression

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Otoplasty

Head Elevation: When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.

Dressings: Do not remove your bandages unless instructed to do so. These will be removed at the office on your first post-operative visit.

Bruising, Swelling and Numbness: Bruising and swelling are normal and typically last between 10-14 days. In addition, the skin around your ears may be numb after surgery, which is normal. Be very careful not to burn your skin with a hair dryer or curling iron. The numbness may persist for several months.

Medications: Please take your prescribed medications as directed on the bottle. The pain medication should be taken only as needed, and then with food to avoid nausea. You should not drive or operate any vehicle while taking prescription pain medication.

Diet: Upon arriving home from surgery, please begin with clear liquids until you are fully awake. Then you may begin to increase the consistency of your diet as tolerated.

Incision Line Care: Please gently clean your incisions with a 50/50 peroxide and water solution and Q-tips. Your incision lines should be covered with Neosporin ointment. They may need cleaning 1-2 times per day. If necessary, your sutures will be removed in one week.

Returning to Work: The average person returns to work 7-10 days following surgery. This varies from patient to patient and depends primarily on the amount of bruising and swelling present.

Finally: Please report the following immediately:

  • Excessive Pain
  • Excessive Bleeding
  • A sudden swelling or discoloration
  • A temperature greater than 100 orally
  • Excessive fatigue or depression

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Chin and Cheek Implants

Head Elevation: When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.

Dressings: Do not remove your bandages unless instructed to do so. Your pressure dressing will need to remain in place for the first 24 hours. Dr. Owsley will remove the dressing, in the office on your first post-operative visit. After that visit, you will need to continue wearing the pressure dressing as much as possible for one full week, and then for another full week only at bedtime.

Ice Packs: Place ice packs over the chin and/or cheek areas for 24 hours. These should be left on for 30 minutes and left off for 30 minutes and so forth. Do not put ice on the surgical areas after 48 hours unless you are told to do so. Ice packs will often keep swelling and bruising to a minimum, but bruising often lasts anywhere from 7-14 days. After 48 hours, moist heat is helpful with swelling. Your skin may be numb after surgery, which is normal. Be very careful not to burn your skin. The numbness may persist for several months.

Medications: Please take your prescribed medications as directed on the bottle. The pain medication should be taken only as needed, and then with food to avoid nausea. You should not drive or operate any vehicle while taking prescription pain medication.

Diet: Upon arriving home from surgery, please begin with clear liquids until you are fully awake. Then you may begin to increase the consistency of your diet as tolerated.

Incision Line Care: Please gently clean your incisions with a 50/50 peroxide and water solution and Q-tips. Your incision lines should be covered with Neosporin ointment. They may need cleaning 1-2 times per day. Your sutures will be removed in one week.

Returning to Work: The average person returns to work 7-10 days following surgery. This varies from patient to patient and depends primarily on the amount of bruising and swelling present. Bruising can be masked with camouflage type make-up after suture removal.

Finally: Please report the following immediately:

  • Excessive Pain
  • Excessive Bleeding
  • A sudden swelling or discoloration
  • A temperature greater than 100 orally
  • Excessive fatigue or depression

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Facial Liposuction:

Head Elevation: When lying down elevate your head on two or three pillows or in a reclining chair. This remains helpful in reducing post-operative swelling through the first week.

Dressings: Do not remove your bandages unless instructed to do so. Your pressure dressing will need to remain in place for the first 24hours. Dr. Owsley will remove the dressing, in the office on your first post-operative visit. After that visit, you will need to continue wearing the pressure dressing as much as possible for one full week, and then for another full week only at bedtime.

Medications: Please take your prescribed medications as directed on the bottle. The pain medication should be taken only as needed, and then with food to avoid nausea. You should not drive or operate any vehicle while taking prescription pain medication.

Diet: Upon arriving home from surgery, please begin with clear liquids until you are fully awake. Then you may begin to increase the consistency of your diet as tolerated.

Returning to Work: The average person returns to work 7-10 days following surgery. This varies from patient to patient and depends primarily on the amount of bruising present. Bruising can be masked with camouflage type make-up after suture removal.

Finally: Please report the following immediately:

  • Excessive Pain
  • Excessive Bleeding
  • A sudden swelling or discoloration
  • A temperature greater than 100 orally
  • Excessive fatigue or depression

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